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How to Travel Nepal, Tibet, and Bhutan

You have a deep desire to see the world, and now you have your sights on the exotic, far East!!! You have heard so many stories about Nepal, Tibet, and Bhutan, that you just got to see these countries for yourself!!!

–Steps–

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1

Look for reliable travel agency to organize your Tibet and Bhutan tour. Tourism is regulated by government in Tibet and Bhutan. So tourist needs to go through travel agency. They will organize your necessary travel permits and visas.

 

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2

Once the date is fixed, look for flight to Kathmandu, Nepal. The connection is easier from Delhi, India. Plan at least 2 office days in Kathmandu before heading for Bhutan or Tibet. It is advisable to go to Bhutan first and then on Nepal tour and finally to Tibet. Tibet visa needs more time to be issued. While your passport is being submitted at the Chib?nese embassy in Kathmandu, you can easily travel inside Nepal.

 

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3

Pack with a good camera, day pack, rucksack or duffel bag, good hiking boats, sneakers and wearings for all sort of weather (both cold and hot) along with your personal things.

 

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4

If you are flying through India, you may have to have Indian transit visa if you are using more than one Indian airport (Indian domestic airports) . Make sure about their traveling rule before departure.

 

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5

You can get on arrival visa for Nepal. But make sure to bring few copy of passport size pictures for the application form. Since you are going to Tibet and Bhutan, apply for multiple-entry visa.
 

 

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6

Fly to Paro, Bhutan and remember your visa should be already paid. Bhutan tour comes in a package with guide, entrance fees, visa, all taxes, accommodation, transportation and all meals.

 

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7

Since you will be traveling over 2,000 m you must pack warm fleece, thermal wear and windproof jacket depending upon time of the year.

 

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8

Tibet visa needs few office days with your original passport. So while your visa is being issued, go on Nepal tour of Chib?twan and Pokhara. You don’t need passport to go around in Nepal. If you are flying to different destinations in Nepal, they may ask for authentic document not necessarily passport. So it is better to carry copy of passport.

 

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9

Don’t carry Lonely Planet guidebook, picture of Dalai Lama and books on him inside Tibet.

 

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10

Take Diamox (Acitazolamide) as prophylactic drug for altitude sickness. This is most effective medicine to prevent or cure Altitude sickness. Drink plenty of water and avoid alcohol at least for few days until you are acclimatized.

 

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11

Respect local custom . Go in a clockwise around religious structures like stupa, monastery, mane walls. Get permission before taking individual pictures and picturing inside monasteries. Don’t make flash if they are praying inside the monastery. Take off your shoes before entering the monastery.

Credit : WIKI HOW

Pattaya City

Into Pattaya Like a boss

Getting into pattaya is very easy comparing to other island of Bangkok, it only take 2.5 hrs max to rich into pattaya from Suvarnabhumi International Airport, after finishing airport immigration,

suvarnabhumi airport immigration

suvarnabhumi airport immigration

you can easily go to down stair for bus or taxi, i would say bus is more cheap then taxi, and other option, the bus from Airport to pattaya will cost 120 bath per person, Bus is AC and big Leg space, bus stuff are very helpfull and informative.

suvarnabhumi airport bus to pattaya

suvarnabhumi airport bus to pattaya

be care full for catch the bus bcz, the bus leave every 20 minute for the counter and there i no Indication for get into the exact bus, a stuff will carry you to the bus from the counter, so if you go for smoking or something please keep your eye on the counter, if the stuff missed you to take you to the bus thn you have to search the bus, and that too confusing bcz there is lots of bus waiting for other direction.

After the bus journey, you have to decide where you have to go, for me i was going to Pattaya Central, so i get down on pattaya central, then you have to chose ur ride for the hotel, it could be a TUK TUK or in a motor bike. the tuk tuk will cost less but go they are very confusing to manage.

pattaya motorbike

pattaya motorbike

i preferred a motor bike to the hotel. they will cost 100 bath to 150 bath for pattaya central. do some negotiation first, then booked it. they are very fast so have ur safety first.

me and my wife fixed a motor bike with two language, for pattaya central for only 120 bath, and the driver is good and fast, he take us to exact location with out any problem.

Booking a Hotel In Pattaya.

i was planning my trip from many month, always looking for good Deal, Discounted Air ticket, Hotels, i got much lower rate in booking Hotels in Pattaya, and i have tell you the MAX HOTEL, The hotel was so clean and worth of money, So simple with every facility you need, mostly the location, Food and Price. the hotel is near by of everything, Walking street, Shopping, Beach. we stayed in there for 3 days and my wife loved it. the hotel have there own small garden with flowers, stuff is  very helpful, what ever they dont understand English, but its worth of your money. trust me, in this location you cant find best deal then this.

Max Hotel In Pattaya

Max Hotel In Pattaya

this is the review of the max hotel in pattaya which i found very good deal to me and my wife, you can also search for lots of cheaper hotels in pattaya central, there is lots of hotels offering 500 bath per night in there banner infront of there hotels, Or Visit Booking.com for best deals over hotels, i personally find Booking.com cheaper then other Site.

Getting into Pattaya Like a Boss

after getting into my hotel and fresh up, we take a walk to near shopping malls and Walking street. we take our most of the meal at  MAX HOTEL and MacDonald, there is lots of option for eating, you have to walk and explore slowly. most of the time me and my wife was walking to streets and seeing everything around us so we can be more explore the city, mostly the pattaya central is the place where all tourist gather all night, Bars, Restaurants open all night, you can chat with the bar lady play some pool with them, they are very friendly and always looking for opportunity to take you to the room and give a massage, haha ya thats true, pattaya is full of massage, there is lots of option for massage. you have to just tell them what you like to do.

remember i was saying me and my wife was walking on all streets so we can more explore the city, now i am telling you why you need to do that, we are walking by a street and saw a fish massage for 100 Bath/15min 130 Bath/30min, we are so excited to do that, so we make it happen for 200bath/15min 2 person, after that we started walking deep in to walking street, and suddenly we saw fish massage center for 50 Bath /20min. so now you understand why you need to walk and explore, pattaya city is full of joy and endless entertainment, but every where you will se the price drop and price up. some bars sell 50 bath all bears, some of them will cost 80 bath all bear. but the environment is same, so why pay more ?

 Pattaya Night Bazzar

Pattaya Night Bazzar is the biggest shopping option for tourist, it has large area of product, many souvenirs options to pick, lots of face product, electronic market, more less you will find everything on this market, but negotiation is must, if you afraid of  negotiation then this market is not for you, they will ask you for 3x price on ever product. you have start your price from 1x.

Pattay Night market

Pattay Night market

Pattaya Night bazzar is also known for food lovers bcz many street food located near to this market, you can find many local foods, see food.

 

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Visit the Top 10 Happiest Countries in the World

The most blissful places on Earth definitely are worth a trip.
Denmark

1. Denmark

Looking for a travel destination with great views and friendly people? Try following a cue from the 2016 World Happiness Report.

Every year the United Nations measures the quality of life for citizens around the world through surveys and data analysis. The same 13 countries have dominated the top of the list since the reporting began in 2012. What makes these countries the happiest in the world? All possess a winning formula of good governance, strong sense of community, respect for fellow citizens, and general high quality of life. While the results do not take into account the experiences from visitors of a country, the report serves as a great benchmark for travelers. “The countries in the top 10 rank high in public trust and generosity,” says John Helliwell, a contributing author of the report. “The people are friendly, they are likely to give good customer service, and from my personal experience, they are wonderful places to travel.” Here are the top 10 places to travel happy.

10. Sweden

Sweden is one of five Nordic countries that consistently sits near the top of the Happiness Report, highlighting the high level of satisfaction found in this region of the world. To experience what makes this country happy, simply visit a coffee shop: Sweden is one of the three biggest coffee consumers in the world. A sense of community is strengthened through the tradition known as fika, loosely translated into “break time,” when locals meet over coffee to catch up, discuss news, and eat pastries. Try taking a fika at historic Vete-Katten in Stockholm, a local sipping spot founded in 1928.

Outdoor cafés line Stortorget square, the oldest in Stockholm.

Outdoor cafés line Stortorget square, the oldest in Stockholm.

9. Australia

Australia is the sixth largest country in the world by area. It has very low levels of pollution, high levels of civic engagement, and tight-knit locals. The popular Australian barbecue brings everyone together; most national parks, outdoor spaces, and other places where people gather offer free or coin-operated grills. Travelers without Australian friends to host them can join the XXXX Brewery and BBQ tour to meet locals at breweries and try a variety of meat and seafood dishes. Or eat with a view during the BBQ sunset cruise on Lake Kununurra in West Australia. (Related: Happiness Is … Being an Aussie)

A cruise in Yellow Water wetlands soaks up Australia's unique wildlife.

A cruise in Yellow Water wetlands soaks up Australia’s unique wildlife.

8. New Zealand

The island country of New Zealand has only been occupied by humans for about 800 years. From the Blue Mountains to the wild penguins on South Island, there are many beautiful sights to lift locals’ spirits in this thriving ecological paradise. Today it has low levels of pollution and is known as one of the most biodiverse islands in the world. New Zealanders take pride in their local ecology and work hard to protect it. Don’t miss the chance to visit the volcano, ancient Maori sites, and craters at Tongariro and Whanaguni National Parks.

 The Emerald Lakes sparkle in Tongariro National Park, New Zealand.


The Emerald Lakes sparkle in Tongariro National Park, New Zealand.

7. The Netherlands

Citizens living in the Netherlands report the highest rates of physical activity in the world. The country takes pride in its 20,000 miles of bicycle lanes for safe travel, and the capital city of Amsterdam is considered to be one of the most bike-friendly cities in the world. Rent a bicycle to try the country’s preferred method of transportation and get some fun exercise during a trip. Either map out a bicycle trip around Amsterdam independently or hire a local guide to show you around the city.

 A tourist takes a free city tour through Dutch company Yellow Bike in Amsterdam.

A tourist takes a free city tour through Dutch company Yellow Bike in Amsterdam.

6. Canada

Vast and expansive Canada is the second largest country in the world by total area, stretching northward into the Arctic Circle. There’s plenty to explore in this spacious and culturally diverse country. In parts of the northwest along the old Trans-Canada Highway, visitors can learn the art of mushing during winter’s dogsledding season. If you prefer two feet on the ground, hike the slopes of the Canadian Rocky Mountains in Banff National Park or Canada’s many national parks.

 Glacier Sky Walk provides epic views at Icefields Parkway in Banff National Park.


Glacier Sky Walk provides epic views at Icefields Parkway in Banff National Park.

5. Finland

Steam your worries away in a traditional Finnish sauna, a revered custom throughout the nation. Despite a population of only 5.2 million people, there are some 3.3 million saunas found throughout the country. You can find them along the side of lake houses, office buildings, and even Parliament. (Related: Finland’s Sauna Obsession)

 Saunas provide the ultimate form of relaxation in Finland.


Saunas provide the ultimate form of relaxation in Finland.

4. Norway

If you’re visiting Norway, rated one of the best countries in the world for its gorgeous landscape, take advantage of the outdoor spaces. You can pitch your tent anywhere you’d like while hiking through Norway’s magnificent fjords. In the summer months, try climbing Mount Skala, one of the tallest mountains in the country, for an exhilarating view of local mountains and glaciers. (Take a look at these other top 10 summer experiences in Norway.)

 Tourists bird-watch among the fjords of Norway.


Tourists bird-watch among the fjords of Norway.

3. Iceland

Iceland surprised many people when it remained in the World Happiness Report’s top 10 after the 2008 economic recession. According to Helliwell, the recession “brought the communities closer together” and helped spur a new era of tourism. Now Iceland Air offers cheap flights to Europe, with extended layovers in the capital city of Reykjavík. Once in the country, travelers find indoor market halls and outdoor swimming pools in the capital city, as well as many easily accessible national parks. If you have time, take a drive along Ring Road to see the island’s volcanoes, beaches, and other outdoor landmarks.

 The Blue Lagoon is only one option to take a dip in Iceland's healing geothermal waters.


The Blue Lagoon is only one option to take a dip in Iceland’s healing geothermal waters.

2. Switzerland

The world’s happiest country in the 2015 rankings, Switzerland is known for being a prosperous nation with magnificent ski slopes and rich chocolate. Switzerland’s thriving outdoor spaces also afford a healthy lifestyle for its citizens: The country boasts the lowest obesity rates in Europe. Discover some of the wild spaces in Switzerland by canyoning, kayaking, or paragliding in Interlaken to explore the vast mountainous landscape.

 Seek new heights paragliding over Interlaken, Switzerland.


Seek new heights paragliding over Interlaken, Switzerland.

1. Denmark

This isn’t the first time that Denmark has been named the happiest country in the world. Denmark offers an abundance of free public services, such as health care and education, and it prides itself on its strong sense of social life and community. You can try visiting the “Royal Copenhagen Christmas Tables” exhibition to learn more about hygge, or a cultural identification loosely defined as feeling cozy in the company of friends and family over a meal.

Angie McPherson is a freelance writer for National Geographic Travel. You can follow her on Instagram and Twitter. 


Denmark

1. Denmark

travel

Solve Every Crisis

You can’t safeguard against every travel upset. But what’s the worst move travelers make? They leave home unprepared, says Alex Puig of International SOS, a U.S. company offering emergency evacuations. Here’s a primer on how to bounce back gracefully from a trip gone awry.

I’ve Been Robbed

One recent survey named Barcelona as the top pickpocketing destination, followed by Rome, Prague, and Madrid. Regardless of your locale, always watch your things when in a new place. Carry a throwaway wallet or decoy purse containing daily cash and old photos but nothing that would make you hesitate to hand it over in a holdup. Keep a credit card and cash in an inside pocket.

1. Hand over the fake wallet.

2. Notify the police.

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My Passport’s Gone

When it comes to your most important carry-on—your passport—practice triple redundancy: Keep a color copy in a safe place (such as your hotel room), leave a copy with someone trusted at home, and scan a copy as an electronic document and store it in “the cloud” (try DropBox or Google’s Drive). Copies of the passport ID page, airline tickets, driver’s license, and credit cards can also help verify your identity.

1. Contact your embassy or consulate immediately.

2. Alert your airline and travel insurance company if you need to change your travel plans.

Credit Card: Denied

Your American credit card may lack a microchip used for security internationally, or your credit card company may cut you off due to its fraud-detection system. Before leaving home, let your credit card company know of your travel plans to ensure the fraud algorithm doesn’t shut down your spending power. While you’re at it, ask your bank about getting a card with a microchip and PIN number, the type accepted in places such as Europe. In 2013, most major U.S. credit card companies are moving to a “smart card” system—cards with a microchip and signature.

1. Call the international toll-free number on your credit card.

2. Switch to debit or cash.

Is That a Riot Ahead?

It may be tempting to lose yourself in a demonstration—especially if it’s newsworthy—but resist the urge and avoid the vicinity of strikes, protests, and mobs.

1. Leave the area of the riot as quickly as possible.

2. Do not take photos. A foray into photojournalism could place you in more danger.

3. Return to your hotel. Or go to the nearest embassy or consulate. If the violence spreads, leave the country.

Scammed

From iffy time-shares sold to resort guests to that “special” offer on Thai jewelry, scams have long lured distracted travelers. Beware of pitches made in places frequented by tourists, such as famous landmarks, airports, and train stations.

1. Notify the police.

2. If you used a credit card, dispute the charge.

3. Report the scam online (Facebook, Twitter) to warn others and put the scammers on notice.

When Natural Disaster Strikes

If you’re staying where a disaster such as a tsunami is a possibility, get familiar with warning signs, such as the sirens that warn of an approaching wave.

1. Heed any official warnings.

2. Ask before acting; it may be smarter to stay put than to evacuate (such as during a hurricane, when seeking shelter is often wiser than trying to outrun the storm).

3. Leave the area as soon as it’s safe to travel.

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Why I Love Bangladesh | By Paul Clammer

Gorgeously green yet swamped with people, Bangladesh is a rural wonderland laden with waterways, peppered with villages and bursting with humanity.
It’s the cycle rickshaws that do it for me in Bangladesh. They’re works of art, from their brightly decorated handlebars and the struts of their canopies to their painted backs, displaying anything from mosques to Bangla film stars. To a soundtrack of bicycle bells, they weave their way through roads as if the words ‘traffic jam’ were unknown. It doesn’t matter if you’re in the smallest village trying to find some ancient mosque or in an upscale neighbourhood of Dhaka looking for a swanky restaurant – if you want to get anywhere, then a cycle-rickshaw is the quintessential Bangladeshi way to arrive.village_of_bangladesh_by_zahinwadud-d4le92j

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Sip Your Way Through Colombia’s Coffee Towns

A new coffee destination bears fruit in the country’s north. TRAVELER MAGAZINE | Nationalgeographic.com

Something is brewing in the small Colombian town of Minca. It smells of caramel, bark, charcoal, and chocolate. The source? Coffee beans, fresh from backyard roasters, their sharp burnt odor cutting through the humid tropical haze.

Here in northern Colombia, the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta range rises straight from the shores of the Caribbean. Long left undeveloped due to political troubles, this now peaceful area draws urban Colombians and savvy international visitors to the palm-fringed beaches of Tayrona National Park, the ancient archaeological site of Ciudad Perdida, and the birding paradise of the jungles around Minca.Recently, Minca and the Sierra Nevada have begun to attract coffee-loving travelers, a collection of connoisseurs and curious backpackers eager to discover what Juan Pablo Campos, general manager of the Lohas Beans trade group, calls “the most important Colombian region for organic coffee.”

Using a pestle, Minca coffee grower Angel Maria Orozco peels the hard outer skin of dried coffee beans.

Using a pestle, Minca coffee grower Angel Maria Orozco peels the hard outer skin of dried coffee beans. PHOTOGRAPH BY FRANCESCO LASTRUCCI

While coffee is not native to Colombia, the plant has flourished for centuries on the country’s steep, shade-covered mountains, with rainfall, altitude, and temperatures ideal for growing the mellow, medium-bodied arabica-style bean. Colombia has been exporting coffee since the early 1800s, and in 2015 alone shipped 840,000 tons of coffee beans. Represented by the fictional ambassadors Juan Valdez and his trusty burro, Conchita, “Café de Colombia” has become known worldwide.

A map of northern Colombia, where the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta range rises straight from the shores of the Caribbean

A map of northern Colombia, where the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta range rises straight from the shores of the Caribbean

Colombia’s better-known “coffee triangle” in the country’s southwest now supports a well-trod tourist track between luxury lodges and standardized plantation tours, but the Sierra Nevada still offers an authentic journey into the past—and a taste of the future of Colombian coffee. In remote highlands, indigenous tribes of Kogi and Arhuaco lead the way in organic coffee production, developing a sustainable farming network that combines traditional spiritual beliefs with modern planting knowledge. These farms embrace generations-old techniques and tools to produce sought-after organic blends, with many beans “triple certified” as organic, fair trade, and rain forest-friendly.

Colombia’s better-known “coffee triangle” in the country’s southwest now supports a well-trod tourist track between luxury lodges and standardized plantation tours, but the Sierra Nevada still offers an authentic journey into the past—and a taste of the future of Colombian coffee. In remote highlands, indigenous tribes of Kogi and Arhuaco lead the way in organic coffee production, developing a sustainable farming network that combines traditional spiritual beliefs with modern planting knowledge. These farms embrace generations-old techniques and tools to produce sought-after organic blends, with many beans “triple certified” as organic, fair trade, and rain forest-friendly.

The gateway to the region is the sunny Caribbean seaside city of Santa Marta, where the bitter street blend oftinto (from the Spanish word for ink) black coffee is sweetened with spoonfuls of sugar. Coffee aficionados will skip the tinto, as well as the ubiquitous Juan Valdez chain stores, and head to Santa Marta’s smaller shops, such as Ikaro Café.

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A local harvest of organically grown coffee fruit eventually ends up as a drink to linger over at Ikaro Café, in Santa Marta.

A local harvest of organically grown coffee fruit eventually ends up as a drink to linger over at Ikaro Café, in Santa Marta.

Exploring the area’s coffee culture is best done during harvest season, from about November through February, and can be as simple as hiring a taxi for the approximately 40-minute, 15-mile bumpy ride from the sea to the hills. Visits to tribal lands require special permission or an organized trip from an approved local operator such as Wiwa Tour.

A stop at Hacienda la Victoria above Minca is like traveling to 1892, when the farm was founded. Husband-and-wife owners Micky and Claudia Weber provide a bean-to-brew education on growing, processing, and roasting coffee. Visitors will see the same well-oiled machinery in use since the farm’s beginnings: water-powered generators, gravity-driven sorters, and hand-cranked presses. Tours conclude with a tasting of their blends, often accompanied by homemade apple pie. Other local farms promote scheduled and drop-in tours and tastings of high-end coffees—a difference from only a few years ago when Colombia had an unofficial policy of “export the best, and drink the rest.”

A stop at Hacienda la Victoria above Minca is like traveling to 1892, when the farm was founded. Husband-and-wife owners Micky and Claudia Weber provide a bean-to-brew education on growing, processing, and roasting coffee. Visitors will see the same well-oiled machinery in use since the farm’s beginnings: water-powered generators, gravity-driven sorters, and hand-cranked presses. Tours conclude with a tasting of their blends, often accompanied by homemade apple pie. Other local farms promote scheduled and drop-in tours and tastings of high-end coffees—a difference from only a few years ago when Colombia had an unofficial policy of “export the best, and drink the rest.”

At Hacienda la Victoria, owner Claudia Weber inhales the robust aroma of freshly washed and dried coffee beans

At Hacienda la Victoria, owner Claudia Weber inhales the robust aroma of freshly washed and dried coffee beans

Drinking a good cup of coffee is just the beginning of a trip to Minca, where swaths of coffee beans dry on streetside tarps in season. Hiking trails wind through Sierra Nevada rain forest to the Marinka and Pozo Azul waterfalls. Hundreds of butterfly and bird species native to the area include “parrots so plentiful they’re like pigeons,” according to one visitor.

A local harvest of organically grown coffee fruit in northern Colombia

A local harvest of organically grown coffee fruit in northern Colombia

Minca plantations may flash back a few generations, but indigenous Kogi farms (or those of the more remote Arhuaco), located deeper in the mountains, are a journey back centuries. The tribes live without electricity in traditional adobe huts with thatched roofs. They often carry their mochila (handwoven knapsack) and wear homespun cotton clothing, white to symbolize the purity of nature. Their traditional conical headgear represents sacred snowcapped mountain peaks. Theirmamos (spiritual guides) perform purification ceremonies of prayer and song prior to plantIt all works in harmony with the land, their neighbors, and modern markets, nurturing a future model not only for growing coffee but for ripening Colombian tourism itself.ing and harvesting the beans.

Where to Get a Cup of Joe

Ikaro Café Local organic coffee, vegan and vegetarian fare, and a bright interior make this one of the best hangouts in Santa Marta.

Tienda Café Fans of this classic Minca spot savor their cups of local roasts (and a brownie) outside on the porch, but head inside for a trove of handicrafts for sale.

Hacienda la Victoria Enjoy un café 
at its source at 
this 124-year-old family-owned coffee plantation, which also offers tours and an on-site bistro.

Where to Stay

Ecohabs Tayrona Thatched seaside bungalows designed by a local architect nestle in Tayrona National Park.

La Brisa Loca At this social Santa Marta hostel, friendships form at the courtyard pool and the rooftop bar.

Casa Loma Minca The view from the top is worth the climb up the long flight of stairs to this Minca hostel on a hill.

Travel to Colombia with Nat Geo A 12-day itinerary includes the country’s southeastern coffee triangle and Tayrona National Park.

BILL FINK (@finktravels) can often be found with a fresh cup of Colombia Luminosa in Oakland, California. Italy-based FRANCESCO LASTRUCCI (@francescolastrucci) travels to Colombia frequently. He says,“It’s almost a second home to me.”

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Six tips to enjoy luxury travel on a budget

Just because you have a limited budget does not mean you can’t travel in style. Here are six top tips for the aspirational budget traveller.

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Finding a good deal to enjoy an exciting weekend break takes time and patience, but the rewards definitely make it worthwhile. Everyone loves to boast to friends and family about an action-packed weekend or an amazing trip away, come Monday morning. As the travel challenge judge on the Nectar Savvy Lifestyle competition I’ll be looking out for inspirational culture vultures who go that extra mile to enjoy new travel experiences for less.

Whether it’s a city break just a train’s ride away, a luxurious retreat, a family day out to entertain the kids or a cool new find just around the corner, I want to get wanderlust from reading their posts and learn new ways to see and do lovely things without breaking the bank. I’d love to hear from you either go on line on cheetra.com or leave a comment below.

Here’s some of my ideas to get you going:

Live like the other half live

Luxury hotel rooms are great, but feeling like you’re lord or lady of the manor for a weekend is tough to beat. Check out house swapping sites and companies such as Airbnb and you’ll be amazed at the incredible accommodation you can find. Why not book a trip away with a group of friends and share the cost of a night in a country manor, or a city centre penthouse apartment? Some rental sites even allow you to book private catering as part of the package so you can really live it up in style for a weekend without spending a fortune.

Valuable lounging time

Budget-Travel-02-300x290Paying for an airport lounge may go against the grain, but it’s a surprisingly great way to get fantastic value for money whilst you wait for your flights in style. It varies at each and every airport, but for around £15 per person you can relax away from the hubbub of the waiting lounge whilst enjoying newspapers and magazines (not just the free ones), charge points, snacks and unlimited hot and cold drinks (sometimes even alcoholic beverages). Even better, lots of airport lounges are free for under 10s and provide them with plenty of entertainment whilst you put your feet up and relax before your flight. It’s lovely to feel like a VIP sometimes!

Be smug about discovering secret treasures

Out of the way destinations are often cheaper than major tourist attractions, but can sometimes offer far culture, culinary delights and sightseeing, away from the hustle and bustle of tourist crowds. How about going to Brno in the Czech Republic instead of Prague? The second largest city in the Czech Republic is full of history and cultural quirks of its own. Alternatively, head to Cesenatico in Italy. Located on the northern half of the Adriatic Coast, between Ravenna and Rimini, this tiny coastal town has a colourful and impressive array of historical boats and there are several inexpensive hotels in the area.

Enjoy a taste of luxury

Many of us take the cities and towns on our doorstep for granted and always look abroad when planning a weekend trip. But with a little bit of planning, you can have a glamourous treat-filled weekend that will have you boasting to all who will listen on Monday morning. If the weather’s nice, you can treat yourself to a luxury ready-made picnic hamper delivered right to your picnic blanket wherever you set up camp – places such as Fortnum & Mason,The Mount Street Deli, Parknic and Picnic2u offer this service. It won’t cost as much as a fancy meal out and you can pick you own al fresco spot and enjoy tasty treats. Watch out for all the envious glances!

Get out on the water

jap-1024x683We may live in a country full of beautiful canals and waterways, but we often forget to think about getting out and about by boat when making our weekend plans. Booking a mini cruise in the UK (other European countries too) or hiring a boat with a group of friends can be a really cost effective but stylish way to enjoy the great outdoors. You’ll find some brilliant deals if you book online, and you can often book catering as part of the package too.  Splitting the cost between a group means it’s a surprisingly low cost way to enjoy a fantastic day out together, and all you need to do is sit back and relax whilst you watch the beautiful scenery slip by.

Hitchhike the modern way

If you are heading out on a road trip, no need to go it alone. There are websites such asBlaBlaCar that now connect you with drivers or passengers who are going the same way. This means you can share the cost of the journey while have company during the road trip.

Copy right’s: http://www.thetravelmagazine.net/

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Highlights from Bangladesh

Bangladesh might not be the first country you think of when selecting a travel destination, yet it has a lot to offer. If visiting here, you will be one of the few tourists around, which means the country is unspoiled. You will be a curiosity here instead of a commodity and Bangladeshis will swarm around you asking questions or simply staring. You will be invited for tea everywhere.

There is more. If you like Indian food you will be in for a treat as Bengal cuisine is delicious. Did you know that Bangladesh is home to the largest stretch of beach in the world? Neither is it completely flat, in the northeast you have hills, with colourful tribes and beautiful tea plantations. Then there are the mesmerizing rivers that crisscross the country while in the south you have the famous Sundarbans National Park where tigers find refuge from human encroachment. For the culturally inclined there are interesting sights scattered all over the country.

  • Dhaka, the chaotic capital, is the first point of entry for most visitors. Walk around Shankharia Bazaar, take a small boat on the Buriganga River, or visit the modern National Assembly Building.
  • Take the slow boat to Barisal or Khulna to get a taste of river-life
  • Try to spot a tiger in the Sundarbans National Park
  • Visit the World Heritage listed mosques around Bagerhat
  • Stroll along the world’s longest uninterrupted sand beach at Cox’s Bazar
  • See the sun rise and set over the Bay of Bengal from the same beach at Kuakata
  • Hike among the tribes and forests of the Chib?ttagong Hill Tracts
  • Drink some tea and stay in the cool air at atea-plantation in Srimangal
  • Lay on the beach on St. Martin’s Island, Bangladesh’s only coral island
  • Learn about Bangladesh’s long gone Buddhist past at the World Heritage site of Somapuri Vihara, once the biggest Buddhist monastery south of the Himalaya
Hints and Tips for Bangladesh
  • You will need a visa to enter Bangladesh, which you can get either at home or at an embassy/consulate in a neighbouring country. Visa-on-arrival is also possible in some cases.
  • Having been part of the former British Empire means that English is relatively well understood and you should easily be able to get by with it.
  • Transport is easy, with plenty of options from buses, to trains and boats, and in the city a cycle rickshaw will get you a long way for very little.
  • Bangladeshis sometimes stare — this is because tourists are so rare that they are a curiosity. Be prepared for penetrating stares like you’ve never been stared at before!
  • Pollution can be a problem in Dhaka and other bigger cities.
  • Bangladesh is an Islamic country, though a tolerant and relatively liberal one with a large minority of Hindus. Still, dress conservatively and don’t drink in public.
  • Monsoon season is from late May till early October. Best time to visit is from October to February.
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Where to Stay in Dhaka.

The best hotels and hostels in Dhaka.

Dhaka is more than just a city; it’s a giant whirlpool that sucks in anything and anyone that comes within its furious grasp. Around and around it sends them, like some wildly spinning fairground ride bursting with energy. Millions of individual pursuits constantly churn together into a frenzy of collective activity – an urban melting pot forever bubbling over.

Dhaka is a city in perpetual motion and the glorious chaos is perhaps best viewed from the back of one of the city’s half-a-million fabulously colourful cycle-rickshaws, which fight for space on the city’s overcrowded streets with taxis, buses, auto-rickshaws and even horse-drawn carriages.

We can’t guarantee you’ll fall for Dhaka’s many charms, but sooner or later you will start to move to its beat and when that happens Dhaka stops being a terrifying ride and starts to become a unique blend of art and intellect, passion and poverty, love and hate.
Read more: http://www.lonelyplanet.com/bangladesh/dhaka#ixzz3zEdF7kck